Jeff nippard high frequency full body program

Leroy Colbert didn't win many bodybuilding titles back in the s, but he was featured on many magazine covers. His claim to fame? He was the first man to build inch biceps drug-free. He was also known for his unique approach to training. Colbert was adamant about full-body training and said he never trained productively any other way. In Colbert's time, the norm was 3 sets per body part. Many bodybuilders back then believed that doing more than 3 sets would make their muscles shrink.

Nevertheless, Colbert went against the grain, started doing 6 sets per body part, and the rest is history. I've successfully recommended this type of routine to dozens of lifters and used Colbert's method exclusively to gain 16 pounds of mostly lean bodyweight while keeping my waist the exact same size. The basic idea of Colbert's routine is to have a list of exercises for each muscle group you cycle through two per training dayincrease the weight whenever possible, and get plenty of rest and proper nutrition.

For example, if you wanted to prioritize your arms, your routine for a particular day might look something like this:. This routine stimulates every major muscle three times a week. Moreover, it's a very flexible routine and you should be able to make it your own and reap maximum benefits with the tips below. Take advantage of the fact you're training each body part 3 times a week by varying the rep ranges.

For example, if strength is your primary concern, then do 5 sets of 5 on two of the days. If you have a favorite exercise that consistently gives you gains, by all means put it as one of your 5 alternates. On the other hand, if something like behind the neck press causes you pain, knock it off the list immediately. Full-body training is very effective at bringing up weak body parts because you can hit them first three times a week.

Want to keep kicking ass in your 40s and beyond? Then you have to add this training modality to your workouts NOW. Protect your waistline from high-carb binges with this supplement.What is the best high frequency workout routine? Increase mass and recovery time with these full workout programs from our forum members! That and more right here. Try them now! Bonus Question : Have you ever used a high frequency training regimen?

If so, how were the results and would you recommend it to others? To use your credit, e-mail Will will bodybuilding.

TRAINING PROGRAMS

High Frequency Workout Routine. High frequency workout routines can be a great training style for quickly increasing muscle mass and improving the body's recovery ability. This training style is not as popular as other traditional routines but those who have used high frequency programs know how effective these routines can truly be. Be Specific. The best high frequency workout routine will focus on mostly compound exercises because they will give you the most "bang for your buck.

The first week of this program will consist of 3 full-body workouts. Over the course of the next few weeks, the frequency of workouts will increase to a total of 6 workouts in one week. A different rep scheme will be used each workout of the week.

jeff nippard high frequency full body program

The more variation in rep schemes the better off you are the variation between 3x8 and 3x10 is not as good as the variation in 6x3 and 3x Rest periods between sets should be kept between 1-and-2 minutes. Higher rep schemes will have slightly longer rest periods and lower rep schemes will have less rest time between sets. Try to avoid training to failure while working out on high frequency programs because training to failure will require more recovery time - which you won't have on this program!

Week This week will be the start of twice-a-day training. Have at least 6 hours of rest between AM and PM sessions. You've finished! Take 5 days completely off to allow your body to recover before beginning your next workout program. The biggest benefit and most obvious reason anyone would undertake a high frequency workout routine is that the increased frequency of training can be great for quickly increasing muscle mass in many individuals.

This program can also be an excellent training strategy to increase your body's recovery rate. This could be good for athletes as a way to prepare for the multiple practice sessions they will participate in when their season starts. Higher frequency training can also lead to better fitness levels than a traditional bodybuilder type split because you will be working your entire body multiple times per week rather than working each muscle group only once every week.

One drawback of high frequency workout routines is that they require more time in the gym than other workout programs. This can make it hard or impossible for people with busy schedules to follow high frequency programs. Another potential drawback is that workouts must be of slightly lower intensity than that used on other programs. High intensity training techniques such as drop sets and rest paused sets cannot be used because they will require more recovery time.Results 1 to 14 of Thread: Thoughts on Jeff Nippard?

Thoughts on Jeff Nippard? Guy seems really informed and all of his stuff is backed by sources so I really don't see anything against his advices but I am new to lifting that's why I am asking if there is anything I should take with a grain of salt. Not that I would do it because I am a beginner Sorry I didn't want to make a new thread on such a simple question like this.

Ppl is good for advanced but pretty much no one reaches that level. I often scrutinize youtubers advice to see how they compare to current literature. Originally Posted by ladyboog. Jeff is fine, he takes good advice from evidence based sources.

He's not as close to the data as people like Alan or Brad but probably gets things right more often than not. There is flexibility in effective training parameters - the result is that the "split" is not particularly significant.

What's much more important is to apply a reasonable workload, exercise selection and progression pattern for a novice. I'm a big fan of Jeff. I think he puts out good content and I've had loads of little useful nuggets of advice from him which I've incorporated into my training etc. I wouldn't personally follow one of his programs, though.

Spreading it out over more sessions is unnecessary because you don't need enough volume to warrant doing so. If you like being in the gym 6 days a week for like 45 minutes each time instead of 3 times a week for 90 minutes then knock yourself out, but I'd find that to be a pain in the arse, personally. Those super programs where muscles are hit with every possible exercise, at every imaginable angle, at high volume, and high frequency tend to exceed recovery capacity after a short while for most naturals.

jeff nippard high frequency full body program

IRL they tend to look more like the volume of an UL split spread over 6 days. You can scroll through all the training logs in this forum. Try not to believe the hype of keyboardists living in their mothers basements that everybody who lifts weights for 3 years needs sets per muscle a week to give them the hyoooge.

The most important aspect of weight training; whether for the athlete, bodybuilder, or average person is to better ones health and ability without injury. Originally Posted by EjnarKolinkar. Originally Posted by odstdrop. Bench: Squat: Deadlift: Originally Posted by Ghawk Does it really matter?

I thought the main thing to do was squats, dead lift, leg press.Related videos Everything Until Now. I let my 3 year old son cut my hair. Dylan Bennett If anyone is interested in an example fullbody split here is what I do.

I was doing an upper lower split. Upper: hor push, hor pull, ver push, ver pull, flys, lateralsLower: SQ Var, HH var, quad iso, ham iso, bicep iso, tricep isoRotating between light and heavy workouts. The essence of what helms recommends the fullbody split for is to better allocate volume, so instead of making up a whole new program, I just reallocated the same volume I was doing for upper lower 4x per week to a fullbody 6x per week.

I will also alternate each workout between light heavy. Each exercise I do for sets, depending on how much volume each muscle group needs for me personally to progress. Light workouts are reps for the primary movements, reps for the rest. Heavy workouts are reps or the primary movements, for the rest. Then I use double progression to progress my lifts. Let me know your critique of my interpretation of a fullbody program, If people reply and like this then ill update in a few weeks time how I am finding my training with this reallocation of volume.

Daniel Holt I can see Jeff's strengths and weaknesses. He does have potential as Mr. Olympia material in the heavyweight range sort of like a mix of Frank Zane, Franco Columbo, and Lee Priest but in the heavyweight range, due to his height he would weigh less like now. For that he would need to do a set to set full body 5 day split. He could even do a 87 set full body 5 day split, that is Dorian Yate's Blood and Guts but with 3 working sets to failure or close to failure either taking Dorian Yates's failure recommendation or Jay Cutler's short to failure recommendation.

While Dorian Yates's advertised working sets a lift, his bodybuilding friends said when they worked out with him that he did 3 working sets a lift for great workouts.

Dorian's pre-exhaust sets were heavy too and so they actually were additional working sets, but to keep it simple do 3 working sets close to failure a lift. But this video it's separate where Jeff's looking at a different style I won't get into.

I see Jeff as Mr.

Full Body 5x Per Week: Why High Frequency Training Is So Effective

Olympia potential. Whiskey Tango I did my old workout routine volume and converted it to a full body x 5 routine after reading about routines like this. For the first time in my life I can say for certain Im over trained even though Im calorically on a maintenance level. Its been good to learn though as I learned that different body parts recover slower than others. My legs for example will not show strength improvement if I train them before days even if the second workout is higher reps.

My shoulders and back however are good to go after days rests and Ive personally observed in my body that the whole high frequency training has diminishing returns if I train a muscle more than twice a week meaning that I regress in size and strength. I feel like the whole body high frequency training is just a reaction to the low frequency high volume bro split.

Its not necessarily any better and is just as extreme if not more so. I still have never found a better a routine than the good old Push, Pull, Legs.With the popularity of high frequency training, a ton of new research has been done on the best training frequency for muscle growth and strength development. Several of these studies have found no significant difference between lower and higher frequencies under volume-equated conditions reviewed on this site or my Facebook page.

Everyone but the most bro of bros agrees by now that most people should train a muscle at least twice a week for maximum growth. The authors said that the split program trained each muscle group once a week, but look at the programs below. In red I commented on what was trained. The authors neglected that pull day trained the biceps and push day trained the triceps. So for the arms the comparison was a training frequency of 2x vs. As you can see, the amount of sets per week, the exercises and the average intensity RM were exactly the same between groups.

Split squats and deadlifts to failure? Macronutrient intakes were also the same in both groups. Here are the results. The full-body group had a greater increase in muscle thickness of the forearm flexors biceps, in bodybuilding terms and vastus lateralis of the quads. The more than twice as great squat gains for the full-body group are also notable.

In conclusion, training a muscle 5x per week led to substantially greater muscle growth than training a muscle once or twice per week. Training a muscle at least twice per week is probably also beneficial for strength development.

There are 2 plausible reasons: training volume and training status. This is the crucial difference that many people neglect when interpreting training frequency research. Most training frequency studies are work-equated. Just think about it: how productive were the hack squats in this program after these guys had done 9 other sets of squats to failure?

How much work could they still produce during the seated rows after 12 other sets of pulling exercises to failure? Not very. As long as you can recover from it, a greater training volume means more mechanical tension on the muscle fibers and that means more muscle growth. In this study, internal work load was also measured. This takes into account the session rating of perceived exertion RPE. Other research supports that higher training frequencies may actually be easier to tolerate and recover from.

Advanced Full Body Workout (BFR, Butterfly Laterals, Calf Jumps, Bayesian Curls) w/ Menno Henselmans

A second possibility is that highly trained individuals inherently benefit from higher training frequencies, even when these do not result in a higher total training volume load.Coach could you weigh in on full body, high ish frequency training?

Something like built for bad, but could be used long term vs. What is your view on this these days? How would you balance the major lifts with assistance to failure? I think that for becoming strong it can be a very effective way to train if you plan the sessions properly. But I do not believe that daily full-workout workouts based on only the big lifts is the best way to get super muscular.

Right now I am doing a phase of training the whole body at every session. I think you can train the whole body 4 - 5 times a week if you plan everything perfectly and vary volume and intensity.

But 5 is pushing it… most top guys train 4. They can go up to 6 if they have elite genetics and pharma support. If I were to train the whole body every day with size as the main focus I would do something like this:.

One upper body lift and one lower body lift, alternate sets e.

Download: Jeff Nippard High Frequency Full Body Program Pdf.pdf

Three antagonist pairings superset if they are low demand exercises like pulley, isolation or machine exercises… alternate if they are more challenging assistance exercises … focus on less CNS demanding movements … these should not be done as heavy as the first two lifts. I would use different main exercises on every day. I was a stimulus addict. And since I have a lot of knowledge I was able to justify my desire to always be in the gym, even though it was counter productive in retrospect.

This is pretty much like a pothead who learns all the complex science about the effect of marijuana and uses it to justify smoking every day. Thank you! Appreciate the quick response. I will dig in here later night time here and try out. As I posted this thread I realized indigo strength fit this bill perfectly and produced tremendous gains.

jeff nippard high frequency full body program

This template looks great, especailly the different exercise selection and intensity rotation. Thank you muchi got the basic gist of it. But when I saw that it led to positive changes rapidly, it became a no brainer.

Like, if CT were to just take up MMA maybe 3x a week weight training or god forbid advanced calisthenics, what would happen to your physique? At your level of development would anything even deteriorate? I would say about 7lbs from being stage shape… lost about 12lbs of fat since the pic I posted and strength is up slightly.Dylan Bennett If anyone is interested in an example fullbody split here is what I do.

I was doing an upper lower split. Upper: hor push, hor pull, ver push, ver pull, flys, lateralsLower: SQ Var, HH var, quad iso, ham iso, bicep iso, tricep isoRotating between light and heavy workouts. The essence of what helms recommends the fullbody split for is to better allocate volume, so instead of making up a whole new program, I just reallocated the same volume I was doing for upper lower 4x per week to a fullbody 6x per week.

I will also alternate each workout between light heavy. Each exercise I do for sets, depending on how much volume each muscle group needs for me personally to progress.

Light workouts are reps for the primary movements, reps for the rest. Heavy workouts are reps or the primary movements, for the rest. Then I use double progression to progress my lifts. Let me know your critique of my interpretation of a fullbody program, If people reply and like this then ill update in a few weeks time how I am finding my training with this reallocation of volume.

New training frequency study: 5x beats 2x

Daniel Holt I can see Jeff's strengths and weaknesses. He does have potential as Mr. Olympia material in the heavyweight range sort of like a mix of Frank Zane, Franco Columbo, and Lee Priest but in the heavyweight range, due to his height he would weigh less like now. For that he would need to do a set to set full body 5 day split. He could even do a 87 set full body 5 day split, that is Dorian Yate's Blood and Guts but with 3 working sets to failure or close to failure either taking Dorian Yates's failure recommendation or Jay Cutler's short to failure recommendation.

While Dorian Yates's advertised working sets a lift, his bodybuilding friends said when they worked out with him that he did 3 working sets a lift for great workouts. Dorian's pre-exhaust sets were heavy too and so they actually were additional working sets, but to keep it simple do 3 working sets close to failure a lift. But this video it's separate where Jeff's looking at a different style I won't get into. I see Jeff as Mr. Olympia potential.

Whiskey Tango I did my old workout routine volume and converted it to a full body x 5 routine after reading about routines like this.


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